Re: Egg Quality
3 Replies
Kellie - March 12

I went thru IVF over a year ago. Prior to IVF all of the usual tests were run with normal results. I'm now 37 and have never experienced any ovulation issues. Our Doctor graded egg quality from A to D (A being the best). I produced twelve eggs. There were eight eggs that were "B" quality. When we arrived for implantation, days later the quality had decreased to "D" quality.

After a recent heartbreak with the adoption of our daughter, I'm again considering IVF as yet another option to have a child.

Can you please tell me if it is normal for egg quality to diminish after retrieval, and what causes it?

Thank you,

Kel

 

Kellie - March 12

I went thru IVF over a year ago. Prior to IVF all of the usual tests were run with normal results. I'm now 37 and have never experienced any ovulation issues. Our Doctor graded egg quality from A to D (A being the best). I produced twelve eggs. There were eight eggs that were "B" quality. When we arrived for implantation, days later the quality had decreased to "D" quality.

After a recent heartbreak with the adoption of our daughter, I'm again considering IVF as yet another option to have a child.

Can you please tell me if it is normal for egg quality to diminish after retrieval, and what causes it?

Thank you,

Kel

 

Dr Smith - March 13

First, a matter of semantics. The eggs did not decrease in quality after retrieval, the embryos did. Sorry to be so picky, but it is an important distinction.

Yes, embryos can decrease in quality from one day to the next. That's exactly why we wait - to determine which embryos have the best developmental potential and then transfer the ones that look the best. If all of the embryos appeared to have poor developmental potential (quality), it may indicate an egg problem. Although you went through the usual tests and the results were normal, there is no test (other than IVF) to determine the quality of the eggs. When IVF is performed and the resulting embryos are of poor quality, these results may be interpreted as an egg problem. Consider IVF just another test. Egg problems can result from improperly managed ovarian stimulation, so it is important to get another opinion about the stimulation before concluding that you have "bad eggs". I would suggest getting a copy of your IVF cycle records and have them reviewed by another Reproductive Endocrinologist before deciding what to do next.

 

Kel - March 14

I sincerely appreciate your feedback. Perhaps there is still a chance.

Thank you!

 

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