compounding
1 Replies
jeninak - June 10

I have several questions re egg quality. I had two embryos transfer - rated "fair" one was 6 cell, and one was 4 compounding.

Question 1: I thought that eggs divided as such - 1 cell becomes 2, 2 becomes 4, 4 becomes 8 and so on. If so, how do you get a 6 cell embryo?

Question 2: what does compounding exactly mean? Does it mean the cells are going from say 4 to 8, or that the whole embryo is splitting/duplicating?

Thanks for the info. I had a positive (87) blood level yesterday but some spotting.

 

Dr Smith - June 11

It is very common to see a 6-cell embryo because all of the cells don't divide at the same time. So it doesn't [i]exactly[/i] follow the 1-2-4-8 cell pattern. Nothing to worry about.

The term is "compacting", not compounding. It means that the cells of the developing embryo have begun to adhere closely to each other. This usually occurs at around the 8-cell stage of development, but can happen earlier or later. In any case, compaction is a necessary prerequisite for blastocyst development which is, in turn, necessary for attachment and implantation.

Glad to hear about the positive hCG. Cautious optimism is in order.

 

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